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At Banzai Cloud we always strive to make things simpler and to make complex services available to our customers. We try to reduce the complexity of setting up components and services by automating as much setup as possible - to expose these for users in a transparent, easy to understand manner. This effort led us to introduce integrated services to the Banzai Cloud Pipeline platform. We have already written about what integrated services are, and we also have described a few of them, like automated public DNS management for Kubernetes clusters and cluster expiration.
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We often find ourselved required to route traffic from external sources towards internal services deployed to a Kubernetes cluster. There are several ways of doing this, but the most common is to use the Service resource, or, for HTTP(S) workloads, the Kubernetes Ingress API. The latter is finally going to be marked GA in K8s 1.19, so let’s take this opportunity to review what it can offer us, what alternatives there are, and what the future of ingress in general could be in upcoming Kubernetes versions.
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Backyards is Banzai Cloud’s widely popular production ready Istio distribution, which helps to install, upgrade, secure, operate, and observe an Istio service mesh. In this blog post, we will discuss the high-level architecture overview of Backyards, three different ways to start using Backyards. Introduction If you’re not familiar with Backyards, and want to know why we decided to build this product, we suggest reading the blog post about the first major release.
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Helm version 3 has been out officially for some time (release blog post was published on Wed, Nov 13, 2019). We’ve been using Helm since the early days of Kubernetes, and it’s been a core part of our Pipeline container management platform since day one. We’ve been making the switch to Helm 3 for a while and, as the title of this post indicates, today we’ll be digging into some details of our experience in transitioning between versions, and of using Helm as a Kubernetes release manager.
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Today we’ve launched the 1.3 release of Backyards, Banzai Cloud’s production ready Istio distribution. Along with some performance improvements and bug fixes, the 1.3 release is centered around three main topics: a brand new gateway management feature, a new declarative installation and configuration method, and support for Istio 1.6. If you’re not familiar with Backyards, and want to know why we decided to build this product, we suggest reading the blog post about the first major release.
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Istio 1.6 is around the corner and it continues where 1.5 left off: it simplifies the architecture and improves the operational experience. In this post we’ll review what’s new in Istio 1.6 and dig deep on the important changes. The Backyards 1.3 release is already based on Istio 1.6. If you are interested in getting Istio up and running with Backyards make sure you register for the webinar! Istio 1.
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If you are a frequent reader of our blog, or if you’ve been using the open source Banzai Cloud Kafka operator, you might already be familiar with Supertubes, our product that delivers Kafka as a service on Kubernetes.

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If you’ve been reading our blog you already know that we’re passionate about observability. We are convinced that the key to operating a reliable system is to know what happens where, and the correlated ability to rapidly dissect issues as they emerge. In previous posts we’ve gone over the base components of our suggested stack, which includes Prometheus, Thanos, Fluentd, Fluentbit, and many others. We’ve created several tools and operators to ease the management of these components, like the Istio operator, Logging operator, Thanos operator as well as using some other very popular operators, like the Prometheus one.
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At Banzai Cloud we write Kubernetes tools that, no surprise, require other tools to get installed. These tools handle resource lifecycle operations like the installation, upgrade, and removal of various components that need to be integrated together. Kubernetes Operators solve all these and even more for a given application’s domain, but if the focus is simply on installation, upgrade and removal of a set of components - which are in our case operators themselves (operating operators), then we need a tool with different characteristics at hand.
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Network perimeter security is a focal point of any network admin. When it comes to network perimeter control, our first thought is always inbound security (ingress). However, securing what can leave the network (egress) and where is equally important. In this post, we’re not going to go into the theoretical details of discussing why, exactly, controlling egress traffic is so important or where possible exploitations points are, because there are quite a few posts already.
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